Greens are pushing to ban store-bought rodent poison to protect native wildlife that feed on dead rats

Greens push to ban store-bought rodent poison to protect native wildlife killed after feeding on dead rats

  • Victoria Greens want to ban second-generation poisons in stores
  • Poison targets vermin, but can also harm native animals feeding on dead rats
  • It can currently be bought commercially from stores like Woolworths and Bunnings
  • Fears of a Victorian ban on growing food in the garden are debunked as false

The Victorian Greens are pushing to ban the blanket sale of second-generation rodent poisons in stores across the state, as part of an agricultural reform bill.

Second-generation rodent poisons could no longer be bought on supermarket and hardware store shelves in Victoria under a proposed ban.

The Farm Law Amendment Bill is being debated in Victoria’s upper house as both houses of the state’s parliament sit.

It will amend 11 different farm laws to address measures such as biodiversity, chemical use, veterinary practice and food safety.

Victoria Greens deputy leader Ellen Sandell (pictured with Federal Greens leader Adam Bandt) urged the Andrews government to support a ban on second-generation poisons to protect the state’s valuable wildlife

Federal authorities last year rejected a request from NSW to use bromadiolone, a SGAR dubbed "napalm for rodents"to control his raging mouse plague due to concern for other wild animals.

Federal authorities last year rejected a request from NSW to use bromadiolone, an SGAR dubbed “napalm for rodents”, to control its raging mouse plague due to concerns for other wildlife.

The bill enjoys bipartisan support, but the Victoria Greens plan to propose an amendment also to ban the general sale of second-generation rodent poisons in supermarkets and hardware stores.

Second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides (SGARs) can currently be purchased commercially from stores like Woolworths and Bunnings.

Unlike first-generation poisons, a blood-thinning chemical used in SGARs can remain active for months and cause secondary poisoning of wildlife such as eagles and native owls that feed on dead or dying rodents.

Federal authorities last year rejected a request from NSW to use bromadiolone, an SGAR dubbed “napalm for rodents”, to control its raging mouse plague due to concerns for other wildlife.

Under the proposed Victorian ban, farmers could still buy second-generation rodent poisons when needed, under licensing rules in Europe.

Ellen Sandell, deputy leader of the Victoria Greens, urged the Andrews government to support the ban to protect the state’s valuable wildlife.

“Every year, countless birds, mammals and native cats and dogs are poisoned by eating mice and rats that have ingested dangerous poisons that you can buy at the supermarket,” she said in a statement.

“These dangerous rat poison should not be on sale in supermarkets and hardware stores, and many countries have already banned them.”

The Agriculture Amendment Bill has already been the subject of debunked viral claims, circulated in Australia as well as parts of Europe, that it will ban people from growing their own food.

“There is nothing in the bill to prevent Victorians from growing their own food,” AAP FactCheck said.

A spokeswoman for the Victorian government confirmed the changes would do no such thing, saying the legislation would instead help safeguard food safety, food security and access to export markets.

Second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides (SGARs) can currently be purchased commercially from stores like Woolworths and Bunnings

Second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides (SGARs) can currently be purchased commercially from stores like Woolworths and Bunnings

A second-generation rat poison is being debated in Victoria's upper house over whether it should continue to be sold in stores, such as Woolworths and Bunnings, as Victorian Greens claim the poison kills people native birds and pets that feed on dead rat flesh.

A second-generation rat poison is being debated in Victoria’s upper house over whether it should continue to be sold in stores, such as Woolworths and Bunnings, as Victorian Greens claim the poison kills people native birds and pets that feed on dead rat flesh.

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