Socialist party – Els Verds http://elsverds.org/ Mon, 16 May 2022 20:03:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://elsverds.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Socialist party – Els Verds http://elsverds.org/ 32 32 How the Oklahoma Socialist Party Shaped the State https://elsverds.org/how-the-oklahoma-socialist-party-shaped-the-state/ Thu, 05 May 2022 10:06:32 +0000 https://elsverds.org/how-the-oklahoma-socialist-party-shaped-the-state/ Use the word socialism over the past decade and you’ll likely conjure up images of political ads claiming control of the United States by the country’s “coastal elites.” But from the turn of the 20th century to the end of World War I, socialism was commonplace in much of the country, including finding a substantial […]]]>

Use the word socialism over the past decade and you’ll likely conjure up images of political ads claiming control of the United States by the country’s “coastal elites.”

But from the turn of the 20th century to the end of World War I, socialism was commonplace in much of the country, including finding a substantial support system among Oklahomans.

“Proportionally it (Oklahoma) was the largest socialist party given the state’s small population. It had more dues-paying members than New York State at its height,” said Stephen Norwood, a history professor at the University of Oklahoma. “At its peak, the Oklahoma Socialist Party could garner almost a third of the vote.”

The rise of socialism in Oklahoma

Cities on the East Coast and the Midwest led much of the early socialist movements where the focus was on workers in industrialized areas. However, movement leaders like Oscar Ameringer soon saw an opportunity among those living in rural parts of the country as well.

“When Ameringer came to Oklahoma in 1907, he realized from looking around that you couldn’t build a socialist movement on the traditional socialist base,” Norwood said. “There wasn’t a lot of industry in Oklahoma.”

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French Socialist Party in disarray after joining new left alliance – EURACTIV.com https://elsverds.org/french-socialist-party-in-disarray-after-joining-new-left-alliance-euractiv-com/ Wed, 04 May 2022 12:28:29 +0000 https://elsverds.org/french-socialist-party-in-disarray-after-joining-new-left-alliance-euractiv-com/ The French Socialist Party joined the New People’s Ecological and Social Union formed by Jean-Luc Mélenchon’s La France Insoumise ahead of the June legislative elections, but the news was not welcomed by all. EURACTIV France reports. On May 1, the first secretary of the Socialist Party, Olivier Faure, shakes hands with Mélenchon, indicating that an […]]]>

The French Socialist Party joined the New People’s Ecological and Social Union formed by Jean-Luc Mélenchon’s La France Insoumise ahead of the June legislative elections, but the news was not welcomed by all. EURACTIV France reports.

On May 1, the first secretary of the Socialist Party, Olivier Faure, shakes hands with Mélenchon, indicating that an agreement is fast approaching.

But it was only in the early hours of Wednesday May 4 that the two parties reached a compromise – after La France Insoumise had already reached an agreement with the Greens on May Day and the Communist Party on Tuesday evening.

However, the negotiations were particularly difficult on “the substance and the constituencies”, said Manuel Bompard, MEP for La France Insoumise and campaign director for the radical left movement. “The PS [was] hard to fit in [its] result in the presidential elections”, which turned out to be more than ten times lower than that of Mélenchon, he added.

However, the content of the agreement remains unknown because the Socialist Party has yet to submit the draft alliance to its own national council, which will meet “as soon as possible” on Wednesday.

Socialist Party in crisis

However, the idea of ​​siding with Mélenchon and embracing his program is not something Socialist Party leaders are too fond of, even though party voters are broadly in favor of such an alliance.

In the socialist camp, the mayor of Le Mans and former minister Stéphane le Foll says he fears that “part of the socialist electorate prefers to abstain or vote Macron” in an interview with the newspaper The Parisian.

“This agreement is first and foremost very important for La France Insoumise. Without it, its weak local presence would not allow it to hope for more than 50 elected officials,” said Le Foll, adding that “Mélenchon’s line is a decoy that will not translate at the electoral level”.

A highly influential former Socialist Party member called the “left-wing deal” “shit”, according to a trusted source who told EURACTIV. “A tactical agreement that ignores substance does not serve democracy,” the character added.

Tuesday afternoon, former Prime Minister Bernard Cazeneuve had threatened to leave the party in the event of an alliance with Mélenchon, saying he would do so out of loyalty “to republican socialism”.

According to him, the movement of Mélenchon “relentlessly fought the Socialist Party” and “that between the two formations neither the values ​​nor the means of action are common”.

Cazeneuve lamented that party members were not consulted before the negotiations and expressed his disappointment that “a few hours [had] enough to forget the most fundamental differences, or rather to keep silent about them”. Cazeneuve criticized Mélenchon’s party for making concessions to dictators and “communitarianism”.

Criticized by the presidential majority

French President Emmanuel Macron’s camp has recently attacked socialists and environmentalists, accusing them of denying their history and struggles.

It is an “extremely sad event for many French people”, in particular for the social democrats, declared Tuesday May 3 François Bayrou, the leader of the Modem close to the president. The Social Democrats “agree to sign the end of everything they have done”, he declared, pointing in particular to the “disobedience” to EU rules advocated by Mélenchon’s party.

The New Socialist and Green People’s Union (NSEPU) will hold a launch event on Saturday May 7 with all the political forces participating in the coalition.

On the same day, Macron’s inauguration ceremony will be held at the Elysée Palace.

[Edited by Alice Taylor]

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The French Socialist Party signs an alliance with the far left for the June elections | France https://elsverds.org/the-french-socialist-party-signs-an-alliance-with-the-far-left-for-the-june-elections-france/ Wed, 04 May 2022 11:58:00 +0000 https://elsverds.org/the-french-socialist-party-signs-an-alliance-with-the-far-left-for-the-june-elections-france/ The French Socialist Party and Jean-Luc Mélenchon’s far-left La France Insoumise (LFI) party have reached an agreement in principle to form an alliance in view of the June legislative elections. The coalition pact, which the Greens and Communists agreed to earlier this week, is an attempt to strip Emmanuel Macron of a majority in parliament […]]]>

The French Socialist Party and Jean-Luc Mélenchon’s far-left La France Insoumise (LFI) party have reached an agreement in principle to form an alliance in view of the June legislative elections.

The coalition pact, which the Greens and Communists agreed to earlier this week, is an attempt to strip Emmanuel Macron of a majority in parliament and stall his pro-business agenda after he is re-elected president in April.

“We can and will beat Emmanuel Macron and we can do it with a majority to govern for a radical program,” LFI MP Adrien Quatennens told Franceinfo radio.

If the agreement between LFI and the Socialists is confirmed, the French left will be united for the first time in 20 years.

The deal was struck under the leadership of Mélenchon, who broke with the Socialist Party in 2008 over his pro-European Union stance, seeking to “disobey” bloc rules on budget and competition issues and challenge because of its free market principles.

A Socialist Party (PS) source said there was agreement on who would run in which constituency and on the overall strategy, but that negotiators had yet to finalize the details of the joint program itself.

In particular, the wording of what the platform of the new alliance, which will run under the banner of the “People’s Social and Ecological Union”, would say about Europe was still up for debate, sources said.

The agreement will then have to be approved by the national committee of the PS.

The policies of the new alliance include lowering the retirement age to 60, raising the minimum wage and capping the prices of essential goods.

If confirmed, Mélenchon’s success in striking a deal with the Socialists would mark a turning point for a party that has given the country two presidents since World War II and has been a driving force behind European integration.

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PS veterans, including former party leader Jean-Christophe Cambadélis, have already called on fellow MPs to block the deal, saying it could mark the end of a pro-EU force on the left.

But the Socialists had little room for maneuver in the talks after a failure in the presidential election after their candidate, the mayor of Paris, Anne Hidalgo, collected a meager 1.75%. Mélenchon placed third.

In a sign of the Socialist Party’s collapse, a source familiar with the talks said the deal – in which only one candidate from each party that joins the alliance runs in one of France’s 577 constituencies – provides that the PS would only have 70 candidates in mainland France. France, and possibly a few others in overseas territories.

A recent Harris Interactive poll showed a united left and an alliance between Macron’s party and the Conservatives neck and neck, each garnering 33% of the legislative vote. However, in France’s two-round electoral system, projections show this could still result in a majority of seats for Macron.

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The first meeting between the Socialist Party and France aimed to find an agreement on the legislative elections. https://elsverds.org/the-first-meeting-between-the-socialist-party-and-france-aimed-to-find-an-agreement-on-the-legislative-elections/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 10:14:31 +0000 https://elsverds.org/the-first-meeting-between-the-socialist-party-and-france-aimed-to-find-an-agreement-on-the-legislative-elections/ In support of the agreement with La France insoumise (LFI) for the legislative elections, with whom EELV is currently negotiating, Julian Beau has called for the creation of an organization. “Alliance” The forces of the left are not there to march on the “rebels”. He recalled that international issues – the two sides widely diverge […]]]>

In support of the agreement with La France insoumise (LFI) for the legislative elections, with whom EELV is currently negotiating, Julian Beau has called for the creation of an organization. “Alliance” The forces of the left are not there to march on the “rebels”. He recalled that international issues – the two sides widely diverge – were set aside to advance in the talks. “The international is not really the domain of the National Assembly”Rather than “President”.

Regarding retirement at age 60, Mr. Supported by Mr. Lenchon’s plan, during the presidential campaign, Yannick Jodot argued for maintaining the retirement age at 62, Mr. Bayou argued: “We are discussing it (…) We don’t want a drop of hot water, we don’t want too little public sector. ⁇ So requested EELV “France must cover its costs because, indeed, retiring at 60 is a great ambition. [mais] It takes effort that we can’t do anywhere else. For example, on ecological change”.

About the European Union in big disagreement, MM Bayou yesterday. He drew the first red line, similar to Jatot: “Organizing Europe à la carte is not debatable (R). Putting your finger on the gear that will take France out of Europe is debatable. ⁇ Questioning on the opposing positions between EELV and PCF concerning nuclear When the ecologists want to get out of it, the communists want to bet on the power of the atom – Julian Beau reaffirms his party’s position. , And again and again: “For us, that’s not in the deal.” If you tell me, we have to leave Europe and go back to nuclear power, it’s without us. “This deal, he argued.

Number of environmental representatives negotiating with LFI “The latest offer we have is 15-20% off 165 blocks”, M. Says about thirty places for ghosts, or environmental activists. He also said he was in favor of changing the banner of the rally in the strategy “Union of People’s Ecologists”But the Greens were fired.

“However, we say that if Jean-Luc Mélenchon offers the same political opportunity to the legislative elections as to the presidential election, it will have the same effect.”, or disunity and failure to rise to power, was considered an environmental activist. Regarding the end date of the talks and the possible agreement, “We have to finish this weekend or this weekend”.

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Fires, floods, blackouts: Climate emergency hits Australia hard https://elsverds.org/fires-floods-blackouts-climate-emergency-hits-australia-hard/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 18:19:43 +0000 https://elsverds.org/fires-floods-blackouts-climate-emergency-hits-australia-hard/ The science of climate change is established to the same degree as the science of gravity. There is no doubt that human society – distorted as it is by capitalism – is driving climate change. Nothing. If you read a climate denialist rant, you are reading the fantasies of someone denying that a ripe apple […]]]>

The science of climate change is established to the same degree as the science of gravity. There is no doubt that human society – distorted as it is by capitalism – is driving climate change. Nothing. If you read a climate denialist rant, you are reading the fantasies of someone denying that a ripe apple fell from a tree. Or that a river won’t go down. Or that the rain will not fall from the sky, as the rain fell on the east coast of Australia. In unpublished volumes since European colonization.

The climate catastrophe is already here; it’s been here since my life. Only propaganda from the fossil fuel and mining industry has obscured this reality. A reality that is now the lived experience of the majority of the population of this continent. And yet deniers continue to lead politics, because there is still money to be made by destroying the environment. And so the systemic absence of any strategy to mitigate or adapt to the human-enforced – capitalism-enforced – disruption of the planet’s ecosystems is not a mistake.

Australia is a good example.

The wildfires that swept across the east coast of the continent during the summer of 2019-20 were, to use the very hackneyed cliché, unpublished. (For clarity, it should be noted that similar fires also struck the Southwest.) While the number of human fatalities and injuries was thankfully low, eighty percent of the population was affected, directly or indirectly, and approximately a quarter of a million square kilometers were devastated. Approximately three billion the animals died. Now, while it is true that no event can be attributed directly to climate change, the scene has been set by years of drought and reduced rainfall. Added, of course, to more than two centuries of colonial land degradation, as European agricultural methods and dispossession superseded tens of thousands of years of traditional land management. Two years later, the landscape is still scarred, with some ecosystems wiped out, some species extinct and many communities simply abandoned by governments.

Many people still live in shacks, mobile homes or tents, with limited access to basic services. They are indeed climate refugees. The pandemic has shown that governments can simply print money when the need arises. The fate of the victims is a political choice. Big business sees no profit in restoring people’s lives and homes. Which brings us to the ongoing flood disaster affecting the east coast and what awaits the devastated communities there.

The Cause of the East Coast Floods is much more directly attributable to the warming of the atmosphere. Hot air contains more energy and evaporates more water. The increase in average global temperature over the past 50 years means that rainfall events are more frequent and more extreme. There is a direct correlation – and the trend is global – with record flooding on every continent except Antarctica. Climate modeling for the past three decades is empirically confirmed by water spots on multi-storey buildings from New South Wales to Cologne to Natal. No amount of fossil fuel industry propaganda can whiten these stains. Nor prevent new, higher ones.

Nor can it erase the plight of climate refugees. It is becoming increasingly clear that residents of devastated towns in northern New South Wales and southeast Queensland are set to suffer the same lasting misery as bushfire survivors. The capitalist state lacks both the will and the organization to restore, rebuild and/or relocate communities.

The neoliberal “reforms” of the past 50 years have had a crushing economic effect. They privatized the benefits of capitalism and socialized the risks. To put it more bluntly, they shifted all the costs onto the working class, small businesses and the poor in general. The climate crisis now lays all that bare. Capitalism is synonymous with misery and death. It offers nothing in the face of the catastrophes it engenders, because it is governed only by accumulation for its own sake. Accumulation characterized by planetary ecological vandalism and human misery.

More than two years later, some members of these communities remain homeless. How long will people devastated by the recent floods have to wait? Photo by Alison Thorne.

What would a well-organized and compassionate society do on flood crises, as a current example? He would provide immediate care, food and shelter, for one thing. It would clear and safely dispose of the wreckage and debris. And, together with local communities, it would plan for recovery, mobilizing all available resources from across society towards this goal. Does this seem utopian to you? Not at all. Just under 50 years ago, this was the federal government’s precise response to the obliteration of Darwin by Hurricane Tracy in 1974. Back then, neoliberalism was an ideology of the future. The impulse towards collective activity was still strong. Even given the deplorable state of remote transportation infrastructure at the time, thirty thousand people were evacuated within six days.

The triumph of neoliberal ideology is such that a centralized, coordinated and compassionate response was never considered either during the bushfire disaster or the current disaster. Indeed, Murdoch’s media was full of insinuations that the disaster was the fault of the victims for living in “flood-prone” areas. As if there were work and services elsewhere. As if at least some of the flooded areas had never been threatened in previous decades.

For me, the striking negation of “do nothing” capitalism of the Morrison government was the immediate collective response of the residents themselves. Hundreds of people have been saved from drowning inside their homes by the neighbor with the three meter dingy or jet ski. And helicopters provided by local pilots and dismayed local millionaires. Meanwhile, contract rescue pilots have complained of frustration at the lack of government orders for mobilization and assistance. The soldiers were not sent, apparently because it was too wet! And then Prime Minister Morrison, ever the conniving and dirty bully, announced that only flooded areas inside a government-held electorate would receive further relief!

It was too much, even for some government deputies. Near-universal outrage quickly extended relief to flooded communities in the neighboring constituency, which just so happened to be held by the opposition. Morrison had been surprised in real time. Yet his cynical gesture illustrates that relief distribution is not limited by resources, but by politics. The money was there all the time. But a straightforward response acknowledges the existence of the crisis. Climate deniers and their supporters cannot allow this. Climate destruction is profitable and nothing should interfere with the cycle of devastation. Not while there is money to be made.

Of course, it is one thing to call for the ousting of a government or the abolition of a brutal economic system. Which is, of course, the only sustainable way to deal with the climate crisis. But what can we demand of governments right now?

First, what was possible in 1974 is certainly possible now. So evacuate those who wish to leave. There are enough accommodations in every major city, with vacant hotel suites everywhere. Second, send all necessary resources to clean up debris, restore services, and begin reconstruction. Of course, this can lead to construction delays in the investor-focused housing sector, but owners can wait for their profits! It would be easy to exempt owner-builders and social housing projects. No need to hurt those who need homes. Moreover, it would free up urgently needed machinery and building materials.

Second, empower communities to make decisions about their future and give them the resources to make those decisions.

Despite the vitriol of Murdoch’s criers, people moved to where settlements existed. That they are in flood valleys and reclaimed swamps is the result of historical decisions or the whim of the original land grabber six generations ago. It seems clear that in the era of climate crises, some communities will have to relocate. But this process must be under the control of the people concerned.

Capitalism has pushed the climate too far to stem the medium-term consequences of climate change. We are in the adaptation/mitigation phase. The floods will only get worse and multiply. This is not an exercise. Catastrophic fires will also increase, although the reintroduction of indigenous land management practices would reduce this risk.

There is no need for apocalyptic preparations; humanity has the means to get out of it. But in the end, only by exercising majority control over the economy and ending the rush of infinite expansion over a finite world will we make the best of a bad situation. And the time to act is right now! No more denial, no more delay, no more blah blah blah! Our world must not be reduced to ruins and those who live there will face a miserable existence. Failure is definitely not an option.

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The Socialist Party “puts a marker for the workers” https://elsverds.org/the-socialist-party-puts-a-marker-for-the-workers/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 07:52:58 +0000 https://elsverds.org/the-socialist-party-puts-a-marker-for-the-workers/ SOUTH Belfast Socialist Party candidate Neil Moore says the executive has not done enough to tackle a range of issues affecting ordinary people, from soaring energy bills to wages. Unite the Union leader Neil is currently involved in wage and condition negotiations in various sectors including transport, education and manufacturing. It is possible that a […]]]>

SOUTH Belfast Socialist Party candidate Neil Moore says the executive has not done enough to tackle a range of issues affecting ordinary people, from soaring energy bills to wages.

Unite the Union leader Neil is currently involved in wage and condition negotiations in various sectors including transport, education and manufacturing. It is possible that a week of widespread industrial action will take place later this month.

“It could almost end up being a mini general strike, especially with the transport and education sectors,” he said.

Originally from South Belfast, Neil has lived in the Ormeau and Carryduff areas. He says the Socialist Party has a strong presence in this part of town.

“We have a very strong branch in South Belfast so it was a natural place for us to introduce ourselves,” he said. “We are running two candidates in this election, myself in South Belfast and Amy Ferguson in Tyrone. We are putting the standing marker of two trade unionists. We believe this will be a very sectarian election. Against the backdrop of the overall political landscape , with Sinn Féin vying to be the biggest party and battles between Unionist parties, we believe the temperature of bigotry will rise and we have seen examples of this before.

Neil said it was important that the Stormont parties were challenged on their records.

“We want to lay down an important marker for the labor movement and for young activists that there must be a left-wing cross-community socialist challenge to the executive parties in Stormont, who have acted shamefully towards working people. We saw it recently when the Alliance defeated the Freedom of Association Bill and the Green Party failed to show up.

“Stormont left out the voice of workers. I was a hotel employee and the current pandemic has left the industry in terrible shape. Attention has been paid to business owners in this sector, but the voices of the workers who help make this sector work have fallen on deaf ears. We want to challenge the pro-corporate, pro-profit and anti-worker actions of the Assembly.

Neil also promised that he would not take his full salary if elected and would instead take the average worker’s salary while demanding pay rises for all workers.

“If elected, I will take the average salary of a young South Belfast worker and the rest will be donated to community projects and hardship workers. Council workers and NHS workers have received a pay rise of miserable pay, while last week Stormont handed himself a £500 pay rise with a clear majority and he is deaf to what ordinary working people face.

“The cost of living has skyrocketed with inflation hovering around 8.2%. Bills have skyrocketed and bosses have scrambled to keep wages low. The answer to this is that workers need to organize to that we can raise wages.In November of last year, Glen Dimplex went on strike and won a 13.5% wage increase, and we need to see more of that as big companies post record profits.

“We need more than these Martin Lewis money management tips to help lower the cost of living. A small grant here or a loan against your energy bills there won’t work, we we need more action and pay rises, for the minimum wage to be at least £15 an hour and the lifting of restrictions on workers organizing and we need to see caps prices on energy bills and rents Rent control is strongly linked to the ability to control inflation and it is a step that the new executive must take.

The Socialist Party also plans to tackle public housing and rent controls, which Neil says will benefit workers and prevent people from being overpriced by converting houses to apartments.

“Private property is a huge problem in South Belfast, rent increases across Northern Ireland over the last year have been around 5%, but in South Belfast we have seen increases of 25-30%.We are seeing real estate speculation and landlords converting houses into apartments for Airbnbs.There is also a lack of social housing.There are lots of properties and empty spaces, but they are not used for housing.

The Socialist Party candidate claims Stormont has failed to do what is necessary to address the climate emergency. And on the lack of a strategy to address gender-based violence, he said: “There is a pandemic of gender-based violence. We have seen a sharp increase in spikes and sexual assaults against women and non-binary people. There have been attacks on women in Holyland, Ormeau Park and Lisburn Road and this needs to be spoken about and addressed as Stormont still lacks a strategy to tackle violence against women.

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What happened to the French Socialist Party? https://elsverds.org/what-happened-to-the-french-socialist-party/ Mon, 04 Apr 2022 09:53:27 +0000 https://elsverds.org/what-happened-to-the-french-socialist-party/ On May 7, 2012, François Hollande narrowly defeated incumbent President Nicolas Sarkozy, ending 17 years of conservative presidencies in France. A month after its victory, the center-left Dutch Socialist Party (PS) and its allies won an absolute majority in both houses of parliament. The stage seemed set for the PS to reshape France. Ten years […]]]>

On May 7, 2012, François Hollande narrowly defeated incumbent President Nicolas Sarkozy, ending 17 years of conservative presidencies in France. A month after its victory, the center-left Dutch Socialist Party (PS) and its allies won an absolute majority in both houses of parliament. The stage seemed set for the PS to reshape France. Ten years later, those days seem remarkably distant.

The PS now only holds 25 seats out of 577 in the French National Assembly. Anne Hidalgo, mayor of Paris and PS presidential candidate, is struggling to do better than the small communist parties; a poll placed her in eleventh place. How did it happen?

Like many stories of center-left decline, that of the PS can be traced to its adoption of right-wing policies, its appointment of unpopular leaders, the loss of part of its base to the far right and factionalism. Any one of them could have been enough to bring defeat in 2017; all at once decimated the party.

First, a little background. Like the UK, France has no proportional representation; MPs and the president are elected in a two-round system, with only the top few candidates standing in the second round.

This two-round system has left the PS on the sidelines more than once, but in 2012 it triumphed. However, the millions of voters who had elected them were quickly disillusioned. Hollande, elected on a tax-the-rich and union-support platform, pursued multiple labor reforms that weakened unions, increased workers’ pension contributions and made it easier for companies to lay off workers – reforms to which his own base and the Public.

“[Hollande] is supposed to be on the left,” a disillusioned trade unionist told the Financial Times. He was not the only one: barely halfway through Hollande’s mandate, the PS had fallen to third place in the European elections; only 53% of voters in Holland supported his party in these elections.

This alienation from the PS base had disastrous consequences: in 2017, the voters of Hollande 2012 supported the leftist Jean-Luc Mélenchon more (24%) than Hollande’s own party (15%).

Yet it was not simply the political choices of the PS that alienated their voters; their choice of president also massively hurt their popularity. Hollande saw his approval ratings decline dramatically during his presidency; at the end of 2016, only 4% of voters approved of him, which made him less popular in France than Vladimir Putin.

It was the result not only of Hollande’s controversial policies but of his spicy catches. In 2016, a book by two French journalists titled A President Shouldn’t Say That revealed a series of quotes from Hollande in which he suggested that the French justice system was full of “cowards” and that footballers needed to “strengthen their brain”, that Sarkozy was a “rude mini-De Gaulle” and a “Duracell rabbit” and the Green party a “cynical pain in the ass”. Hollande even insulted his own ministers.

Although Hollande ultimately chose not to run again, the damage was done. Some moved to left-wing parties, but others went in the opposite direction: the far-right National Front (FN) emerged under President Hollande, its growth attributed to economic decline, the effects of globalization, opposition to immigration and the rise of Islamophobia.

Not only did the PS do little to address these problems, it exacerbated them. Under Hollande, unemployment soared to 10%, while the president declared his country had “a problem with Islam” and refused to repeal the burqa ban imposed by his predecessor. As expected, the PS’s refusal to oppose Islamophobia has not weakened the far right: support for FN candidate Marine Le Pen among workers has fallen from 25% in 2012 to 39% in 2017.

The ultimate cause of the PS’s collapse was a damaging split in the party precipitated by Emmanuel Macron’s decision to mount an independent presidential bid. Macron, a centrist who had served in Hollande’s cabinet, refused to take part in the PS primary and instead ran under the banner of his own party, En Marche.

Several senior PS officials have backed Macron against PS candidate Benoit Hamon, including former prime minister Manuel Valls, Lyon mayor Gérard Collomb, former Paris mayor Bertrand Delanoë and several MPs. Most PS voters followed them: 47% of those who voted for Hollande in 2012 went on to vote for Macron in the first round in 2017. Only 15% voted for Hamon.

All of these factors – a disillusioned base, a deeply unpopular incumbent, a resurgent far-right and a divided party – combined to give the PS their worst ever result. Five years later, the party has yet to recover. In the 2019 European elections, it fell further; ahead of the 2022 race, the party seriously considered not running due to a lack of funds.

The PS is unlikely to disappear in the immediate future; the nature of the French two-round system and the tendency of parties to form alliances means that they are likely to retain a medium-sized group of MPs. But the collapse of the PS remains a cautionary tale for centre-left parties. Alienating your base, pushing right-wing policies and failing to challenge far-right rhetoric can have disastrous consequences – and a divided party will not succeed.

El Folan is the founder of Statistics for lefties and columnist for Novara Media.

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Scottish Socialist Party launches manifesto https://elsverds.org/scottish-socialist-party-launches-manifesto/ Mon, 04 Apr 2022 04:05:17 +0000 https://elsverds.org/scottish-socialist-party-launches-manifesto/ The Socialist Party of Scotland (SSP) yesterday launched its manifesto for the May municipal elections, with a set of policies designed to tackle the escalating cost of living crisis. At the heart of the party’s campaign is a plan to scrap council tax and replace it with an income-based alternative – an idea first proposed […]]]>

The Socialist Party of Scotland (SSP) yesterday launched its manifesto for the May municipal elections, with a set of policies designed to tackle the escalating cost of living crisis.

At the heart of the party’s campaign is a plan to scrap council tax and replace it with an income-based alternative – an idea first proposed by the SNP when elected in 2007.

The SSP said: ‘Our proposed Scottish service charge not only shifts the burden of council funding from the poor and middle earners to the better off, but generates an additional £2 billion for struggling council services.’

SSP councilors will also pledge to oppose all cuts to public services and campaign for the return of the millions of pounds lost to the cuts as Scots head to the polls on May 5 .

READ MORE: Can we repeat the success of the 1990s campaign against poll tax?

To tackle Scotland’s housing crisis, SSP advisers will demand that 100,000 new rental homes be built in the public sector, meeting the highest environmental standards, alongside a similarly sized program to upgrade housing existing ones so that they meet the same standards.

The SSP will demand that energy companies become public again to ensure affordable green energy for everyone in Scotland.

They will also advocate for the reinstatement of the £20 a week cut for Universal Credit recipients and campaign for a national minimum wage of £12 an hour, with equal pay for all.

The party added: “With poverty ruining the lives and opportunities of hundreds of thousands of Scots, references to food banks are rising dramatically and the price of energy, petrol and basic foodstuffs rising. at a dizzying pace, SSP advisers will campaign to change the rules of the game that so clearly disadvantage workers.

“To meet the needs of working people, we will advocate for free public transport (an increasingly popular policy first proposed by the SSP 20 years ago) to reduce road pollution, poverty and stimulate social inclusion.

“SSP candidates are seeking election on May 5 to break the cycle of poverty, privatization and profiteering that so dominates today’s council chambers,” they added.

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French Presidential: Five more years for Macron? https://elsverds.org/french-presidential-five-more-years-for-macron/ Wed, 30 Mar 2022 11:02:18 +0000 https://elsverds.org/french-presidential-five-more-years-for-macron/ Macron, President of France. Photo: OECD/CC OECD Headquarters, Paris, France Photo: OECD/Andrew Wheeler Leïla Messaoudi, Secretary General of the Revolutionary Left (CWI, France) Anger at rising prices, record profits for multinationals and French shareholders, destruction of public services, reduction of the rights of the unemployed and wage strikes underway for several months… As in the […]]]>

Leïla Messaoudi, Secretary General of the Revolutionary Left (CWI, France)

Anger at rising prices, record profits for multinationals and French shareholders, destruction of public services, reduction of the rights of the unemployed and wage strikes underway for several months… As in the rest of the world, instability is the rule in France.

The last five years in power of President Emmanuel Macron are synonymous with exacerbated social tensions: the “Yellow Vests” movement, movements for more social justice, mobilizations against the pension reform in 2019, etc.

The Covid crisis has, for a time, anesthetized the struggles. Using the pandemic and unable to protect the population, Macron preferred to impose a very repressive state of health emergency during the first confinement.

The aforementioned struggles did not result in a decisive victory against Macron and the capitalists, even though the government was forced to temporarily back down on the attack on pensions. And on the political front, no party or political force has mobilized a coordinated opposition of workers and the general population against these policies.

Only France Insoumise (FI), with its 17 deputies (MPs) in the National Assembly, and its leader, Jean-Luc Mélenchon, represented substantial opposition to Macron.

What does Macron want?

Macron officially announced his candidacy for the presidency at the end of February, just six weeks before the first round of the election, which will take place on April 10. The war in Ukraine serves as a justification for not campaigning and for saying that his re-election is inevitable.

On March 18, Macron announced his program to fight for the interests of the bosses! He wants a later retirement at 65, compulsory work for recipients of social minima, the dismantling of national education by attacking the status of teachers and then of others, a refocusing on the flagship sectors of energy supply (nuclear), etc. The same program as the traditional line!

The capitalists thus have in Macron the political representative of their class and intend to keep him for another five years. The bourgeois (capitalist) parties, initially of the classical right, such as Sarkozy’s Les Républicains or the “bourgeoisified” Socialist Party (SP) of François Hollande and Anne Hidalgo, have for the moment collapsed. Indeed, little or nothing in their program distinguishes them from Macron and his policies.

From the standpoint of the election itself, Macron is hoping for a runoff with Marine Le Pen, which would see him elected hands down. There is little chance that Le Pen’s RN (“Rassemblement National”, ex Front National) can win. His profile has not been able to evolve over the past five years.

The nationalist right and the far right dominated the start of the election with a virulent anti-immigration campaign. But rising prices and the cost of living have returned to the center of the debate. Social issues remain central.

The right and the extreme right are in crisis and are regrouping around Eric Zemmour, the racist, sexist and ultra-liberal politician. Le Pen is on the other side, with the Republicans.

How to defend yourself

The challenge is for workers and young people, who are most aware of the issues, to be able to express their own views as clearly as possible. We need a vote against Macron and the capitalists, the right and the far right, but also a vote that breaks with all the policies carried out in the name of the capitalists by the PS and the Greens in government and in the regions and departments.

Jean Luc Melenchon. Photo: Mathieu/CC

On the political left, Jean-Luc Mélenchon of France Insoumise-Union Populaire is running again. In the first round of the 2017 presidential election, he won 19.6% of the vote, narrowly failing to contest the second round against Macron.

Mélenchon is the only candidate capable of playing a central role in reaching those of the working classes who want to fight Macron, but also the growing number of abstainers.

On the basis of his “Common Future” program, Mélenchon succeeded in bringing together activists from social movements, organizations and parties in a grouping called “L’Union populaire” (Gauche Révolutionnaire – Revolutionary Left – part of the Parliament of Union Populaire and has been building France Insoumise since 2017).

Registering between 13% and 15% in the polls, Mélenchon is in third position, just behind Le Pen, and Macron, who is in the lead. Mélenchon is now ahead of Zemmour, who loses points, and Valérie Pécresse of the right-wing Republicans. He leaves the Greens and PS candidates far behind.

The PCF (French Communist Party) has unfortunately chosen this time to go it alone, essentially to continue to exist, and its candidate receives around 4 to 5%.

This is not trivial, and shows the potential of a single FI-PCF candidate. The PS, on the other hand, reached a historic low of 2%-3%, at the same level as the NPA (New Anticapitalist Party) of Philippe Poutou and Olivier Besancenot, also candidates, as well as Lutte Ouvrière (workers’ struggle).

Combative program

Mélenchon’s program calls for: freezing prices, developing public services, creating real jobs and increasing wages. These are the crucial pillars of the program.

The only force capable of implementing these measures is the working class through the establishment of a workers’ government. But ‘Common Future’ only goes halfway. It does not deal with how to change society and end capitalism, and why we must fight for a socialist society.

For these reasons, the Revolutionary Left campaign to support Mélenchon’s candidacy, in France Insoumise, and also with our own material, seeks to go further on certain demands by fighting for: the state monopoly of public health services, the renationalization under workers’ control; decent jobs for all; an increase in the minimum wage; pensions and wages; retirement at age 60; increased resources for public services; the renationalization of Energie de France and Engie; and railways.

We also have disagreements, such as on international issues, and the illusions that Mélenchon has about international capitalist institutions, and about a supposedly historic role for France abroad.

On the streets, in door-to-door campaigns and in the workplace, campaigning for Mélenchon greatly facilitates the political debate around ways to fight the capitalists. These also provide the basis for a discussion of the role that a genuine mass workers’ party could play for socialism in the period to come.

As Mélenchon’s latest poster says, “another world is possible!” We say yes, a socialist world is necessary!


Committee for a Workers’ International (CIO)

The Committee for a Workers’ International (CWI) is the international socialist organization to which the Socialist Party is affiliated. The CWI is organized in many countries. We work to unite working class and oppressed peoples against capitalism and fight for a socialist world.

socialistworld.net

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Nuclear: the government invests in a privatized power plant https://elsverds.org/nuclear-the-government-invests-in-a-privatized-power-plant/ Wed, 30 Mar 2022 10:13:41 +0000 https://elsverds.org/nuclear-the-government-invests-in-a-privatized-power-plant/ Cooling tower Photo: piqsels.com Dave Carr, East London Socialist Party The Johnson government reinforces its commitment to developing nuclear energy with the announcement that it will take a 20% stake in the new ‘Sizewell C’. The pressurized water reactor, being built in Suffolk by EDF, France’s majority state-owned energy company, is of the same design […]]]>

Dave Carr, East London Socialist Party

The Johnson government reinforces its commitment to developing nuclear energy with the announcement that it will take a 20% stake in the new ‘Sizewell C’. The pressurized water reactor, being built in Suffolk by EDF, France’s majority state-owned energy company, is of the same design as EDF’s Hinkley C nuclear power station under construction in Somerset.

Government ministers justify this guarantee of the controversial project on the grounds that it moves the economy away from fossil fuels to achieve its goal of net zero emissions of carbon dioxide by 2050 and to improve “energy security” in light of the war in Ukraine.

Fossil Fuel Tax Breaks

None of this is true. The government continues to give tax breaks and other incentives to ‘big tankers’, and the amount of Russian gas imported into the UK is less than 4% of what is used. Incidentally, “energy security” concerns didn’t stop China’s state-owned General Nuclear Power Corporation from acquiring a minority stake in Hinkley C.

In reality, the government is trying to support EDF’s deeply flawed nuclear program in the UK.

All eight existing nuclear power plants were sold to EDF after Labor privatized British Energy in 2007, but these old reactors are nearing the end of their life and are due to be shut down by 2030.

Brown gave EDF the green light to build Hinkley C with a new pressurized water reactor design in 2008. Conservative Chancellor George Osborne signed the deal in 2012 when the estimated cost was £16billion.

As part of this agreement, EDF was guaranteed a wholesale price for its nuclear energy, linked to inflation. If the price (more than double the cost per kilowatt-hour compared to renewables) fell below the benchmark, domestic consumers (us) would make up the difference.

In June 2017, the National Audit Office report on Hinkley C stated: “The (BEIS) department has engaged electricity consumers and ratepayers in a costly and risky deal”.

By January 2021, the estimated construction cost for Hinkley C had risen to £23 billion and it continues to rise. Its start date of 2023 has been pushed back to June 2026.

Hinkley C has to be the most expensive government job creation program in history!

However, it is conceivable that it does not start at all. Hinkley C’s design mirrors EDF’s Flamanville 3 nuclear reactor in northern France, construction of which began in 2007. It has been hampered by safety concerns and construction delays. As of 2020, it was five times over budget and the “ten-year project” is not expected to start producing electricity until 2024. France’s then energy minister, Barbara Pompili, called the project a “mess “.

Why is the British government going ahead with such a ‘white elephant’? It is largely ideological, wanting to promote a profit-driven “market-based solution” to meeting energy needs. This is despite the fact that no private consortium would touch large-scale nuclear energy with a barge pole without the investment of massive sums of public funding.

But as The Guardian revealed, the civilian nuclear power industry also provides the technical know-how needed to maintain the government’s Trident nuclear weapons capability.

The alternative to phasing out fossil fuels is not expensive and toxic nuclear power, but investing in green renewables such as wind, solar and wave power. In addition, a national home and workplace insulation and energy efficiency program would massively reduce overall energy demand and create hundreds of thousands of highly skilled jobs. However, such a green energy program relies on public ownership under a democratically agreed generation plan – a socialist system.

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