Ecological diversity – Els Verds http://elsverds.org/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 23:59:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://elsverds.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Ecological diversity – Els Verds http://elsverds.org/ 32 32 Douglas to “anchor sustainability” by prioritizing clean beauty, diversity and climate protection https://elsverds.org/douglas-to-anchor-sustainability-by-prioritizing-clean-beauty-diversity-and-climate-protection/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 13:53:00 +0000 https://elsverds.org/douglas-to-anchor-sustainability-by-prioritizing-clean-beauty-diversity-and-climate-protection/ German beauty retailer Douglas has released its first sustainability report which sets out its global strategy and targets for 26 countries. Its key initiatives revolve around showcasing clean beauty and natural cosmetics across its product line, ensuring diversity is championed across its brand, and achieving climate neutrality in scopes 1 and 2 (direct and indirect […]]]>

German beauty retailer Douglas has released its first sustainability report which sets out its global strategy and targets for 26 countries. Its key initiatives revolve around showcasing clean beauty and natural cosmetics across its product line, ensuring diversity is championed across its brand, and achieving climate neutrality in scopes 1 and 2 (direct and indirect emissions) by the end of 2025.

Tina Müller, CEO of the Douglas Group, said the company is aware of its great ecological and social responsibility. She added: “At the same time, the expectations of our customers have risen considerably: sustainability aspects are among the decisive purchasing criteria alongside quality and price.”

“Sustainable thinking and acting must be among the top priorities in our own activities as well as in cooperation with suppliers and business partners.”

Define a sustainable development strategy

In developing its first global sustainability report, Douglas details its priorities and plans, focusing on four main areas of action: people, products, planets and governance. By forming these key areas, Douglas identifies several priority issues, centered on the company’s operations and teams and its impact on the whole world.

Commercially, Douglas will focus on customer satisfaction and shopping experience, diversity, equality and inclusion, and employee engagement. In order to consider its global impact, the brand has decided to prioritize its sustainable range, especially for private labels, including CO2 emissions reduction, resource efficiency and environmental commitment, social and governance (ESG) management.

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A dataset on the diversity and distribution of rodents and shrews in China https://elsverds.org/a-dataset-on-the-diversity-and-distribution-of-rodents-and-shrews-in-china/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 09:43:08 +0000 https://elsverds.org/a-dataset-on-the-diversity-and-distribution-of-rodents-and-shrews-in-china/ Data gathering The protocols given here have been adapted from previously published literature retrieval efforts. A guide to our extraction has been included in Figure 1 and shows the overall process we followed to produce this dataset. We searched PubMed and ISI Web of Science for literature published in English, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure […]]]>

Data gathering

The protocols given here have been adapted from previously published literature retrieval efforts. A guide to our extraction has been included in Figure 1 and shows the overall process we followed to produce this dataset. We searched PubMed and ISI Web of Science for literature published in English, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), VIP Database and Wanfang Database as the main sources published in Chinese between 1950 and 2021. We used the following search terms: “Rodent”, “Mouse”, “Rat”, “Shrew” and “China”, in combination with each of the 18 families of rodent and shrew species (in English or Chinese). A secondary manual search of the references cited in these articles was also performed to find relevant articles. To complete, the historical collection of rodent-related documents that have been documented in Chinese publications, with the multiple books (Fauna sinica, mammal, vol.6(2), cricetidae15A guide to the mammals of China16Distribution of Mammal Species in China17Colored Atlas of Chinese Mammals18Mammals of Tibet19China Biodiversity Red List: Vertebrates, Volume I, Mammal20Atlas of Epidemiology of Diseases with Natural Focus in China21Beijing wildlife22Wildlife of Guizhou23, etc.), were also examined. In addition, we standardize the species lists of China mammals from a guide to China mammals16 and Catalog of Mammals in China (2021)24.

Fig. 1

Systematic database retrieval, screening and inclusion flowchart.

Two researchers independently reviewed the information for each rodent and shrew species, and entered the data into a standardized sheet to establish a database. Discrepancies were resolved through discussion between the two researchers and facilitated by a third principal investigator to reach consensus, and for records where the time of discovery and location were missing from the articles, we contacted the corresponding authors. for detailed information. Species lists have been reviewed by specialists in small mammal groups20. Detailed descriptions of the literature search and schematic procedures are provided in Fig. 1.

Using the keyword search, a total of 58,021 articles were retrieved for selection, comprising 15,959 articles from the English database and 42,062 articles from the Chinese database. For the second screening step, the abstracts of all returned references were screened to exclude those that reported only clinical cases or laboratory data or that reported diagnostic development, without mentioning any specific rodent species. For the third stage of selection, we reviewed in detail the full text of all the remaining 720 articles, from which a total of 430 Chinese articles and 290 English articles were determined as eligible for data extraction (Fig. 1 ). The first Chinese and English publications were published in 1958 and 1986, respectively, and a sharp increase in literature with records of rodents and shrews was observed after 1980 (Fig. 2). Key data were extracted from articles, books, field surveys and websites obtained: (i) name of rodent and shrew species, (ii) geographical location information reported at province, city ​​and county, (iii) time of identification and reports, (iv) source of articles, books, field surveys and websites. All data was entered into an Excel spreadsheet for downstream analysis. After the initial data entry, a second edit by two people was performed to correct errors and remove duplicates. In particular, historical changes in rodent and shrew taxonomy have been taken into account and standardized terminology has been applied for the same species.24. Where necessary, the names of study sites that were historically used have been updated with the current name. A total of 13,911 records were compiled, with multiple records in each province presented over the years of study (Fig. 2).

Figure 2
Figure 2

The number of reported records for rodents and shrews in different provinces between 1950 and 2021 is shown on the map of mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan. The ring contains the data of records for rodents and shrews in other regions in 7 periods, and the latitude and longitude of the capital of each province are indicated. Note: The name of each province follows the national standard of China (GB/T 2260-2007) on the map.

Geo-positioning

Location information was manually extracted at the highest resolution for each rodent and shrew record and then categorized into three administrative levels such as province, city, and county. For a species, we remain only one record at the county level if various geographic locations (e.g., township, village) were reported within a county, then we remove duplicates for those records in the same county from different studies. For publications that did not report an administrative region or specific coordinates, for example, a scenic area or a mountain, we searched for the coordinates of survey sites using Baidu Map (https://map.baidu.com/) and recorded their coordinates, which were linked to the county map using ArcGIS 10.7 software (ESRI Inc., Redlands, CA, USA) to obtain county-level location information. Maps of Chinese administrative boundaries of province, city and county (2015) were collected from the Chinese Academy of Sciences Resource and Environment Data Cloud Platform (http://www.resdc.cn). A total of 13,911 records were identified, including 1,419, 1,087, and 11,405 records at the province, city, and county levels, respectively. A “Location Level” field was used to accurately demonstrate the spatial resolution such as province, city, or county for each record in our dataset. This classification allowed separate extraction and use at different spatial levels for various purposes. We used RStudio Version 1.4.1103 and ArcGIS 10.7 software to analyze and statistically visualize the geographical data obtained.

]]> Global warming decreases microbial diversity — ScienceDaily https://elsverds.org/global-warming-decreases-microbial-diversity-sciencedaily/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 21:10:56 +0000 https://elsverds.org/global-warming-decreases-microbial-diversity-sciencedaily/ Researchers at the University of Oklahoma have found that global warming decreases microbial diversity, essential for soil health. Led by Jizhong Zhou, Ph.D., director of OU’s Institute of Environmental Genomics, the research team conducted an eight-year experiment that found that global warming played a prominent role in the formation of microbial biodiversity, with a significant […]]]>

Researchers at the University of Oklahoma have found that global warming decreases microbial diversity, essential for soil health. Led by Jizhong Zhou, Ph.D., director of OU’s Institute of Environmental Genomics, the research team conducted an eight-year experiment that found that global warming played a prominent role in the formation of microbial biodiversity, with a significant negative effect. Their findings are published in Natural microbiology.

“Climate change is a major driver of biodiversity loss from local to global scales, which could further alter ecosystem functioning and services,” Zhou said. “Despite the critical importance of subsurface soil biodiversity in maintaining ecosystem functions, how climate change might affect the richness and abundant distribution of soil microbial communities (bacteria, fungi, protists) does not has not been resolved.”

Using a long-term multifactorial experimental field site at OU, researchers from the university’s Institute of Environmental Genomics examined changes in soil microbial communities in response to experimental warming, precipitation change and clipping (annual biomass removal) on bacterial, fungal grassland soil and protistan biodiversity since 2009.

“Our results show explicit evidence that long-term global warming reduces microbial biodiversity on the ground,” Zhou said. “Furthermore, this is the first study documenting the differential responses of spore-forming and non-spore-forming microbes to global warming, and it is the first study documenting the predominant role of warming in the regulation of microbial biodiversity.

“Our findings have important implications for predicting the ecological consequences of climate change and for managing ecosystems,” he added. “Furthermore, since the effects of global warming on biodiversity are primarily a reduction in humidity, it is expected that the loss of biodiversity induced by warming will be more severe in arid areas – arid ecosystems, semi-arid and dry sub-humid regions that cover 41% of the world’s land.”

According to Zhou, a better understanding of future warming-induced precipitation changes could be important in mitigating warming-induced decreases in biodiversity.

The article, “Reduction of Microbial Diversity in Grassland Soil is Driven by Long-Term Global Warming,” is published in Natural microbiology, #10.1038/s41564-022-01147-3. The research is supported by funding from the Science Office of the Department of Energy, DE-SC0004601 and DE-SC0010715. Zhou is also the George Lynn Cross Research Professor at Dodge Family College of Arts and Sciences and Adjunct Professor at the Gallogly College of Engineering at the University of Oklahoma.

Source of the story:

Materials provided by University of Oklahoma. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

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Pipeline installation boosts diversity of seabed animals • Earth.com https://elsverds.org/pipeline-installation-boosts-diversity-of-seabed-animals-earth-com/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 14:50:09 +0000 https://elsverds.org/pipeline-installation-boosts-diversity-of-seabed-animals-earth-com/ As part of a collaboration between BP Angola and deep-sea researchers, a wildlife survey was carried out near pipelines being installed off the coast of West Africa. “We have a long-standing collaboration with BP in Angola to use the survey imagery equipment for science,” explained study co-author Andrew Gates of the National Center for Oceanography. […]]]>

As part of a collaboration between BP Angola and deep-sea researchers, a wildlife survey was carried out near pipelines being installed off the coast of West Africa.

“We have a long-standing collaboration with BP in Angola to use the survey imagery equipment for science,” explained study co-author Andrew Gates of the National Center for Oceanography.

Research shows that there was an immediate increase in animal life near where the pipes were installed.

“In a short time, the installation of a pipeline resulted in an increase in the abundance and diversity of marine life in most areas,” said study co-author Daniel Jones. “We think it might be related to the pipeline providing shelter and trapping organic matter that the animals feed on.”

“It was also surprising to see the huge amount of trash, which consisted of plastic bags, bottles and aluminum cans, as this is a remote area ranging from 700 to 1,400 meters deep. “

The footage was collected using a remotely operated vehicle, a type of submarine that’s about the size of a car and controlled by a cable connecting to a ship above.

“We realized as soon as we saw the footage that this would allow us to explore how marine life changed after a pipeline was introduced. Doing this kind of survey is very difficult and expensive, so we were delighted to be able to use the images to better understand deep sea biology. This adds real value to the video footage originally collected to inspect the pipeline.”

Scientists believe that some of the creatures captured on film may be new species to science, but it’s usually impossible to identify deep-sea animal species by video. Scientists hope to return soon to collect specimens.

“In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the installation of a pipeline can cause considerable changes in the fauna of certain areas of the continental slope”, write the researchers. “These changes are very depth dependent and likely depend on both the nature of the community and the potential for the pipeline to trap organic matter.”

“It is likely that the results presented here are only an early stage in a succession of ecological changes resulting from the installation of a deep-sea pipeline, with later stages largely unknown.”

The study is published in the journal Marine Science Frontiers.

By Zach Fitzner, Terre.com Personal editor

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    Alaska Region Aquaculture Program Expands Diversity and Inclusion https://elsverds.org/alaska-region-aquaculture-program-expands-diversity-and-inclusion/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 18:45:49 +0000 https://elsverds.org/alaska-region-aquaculture-program-expands-diversity-and-inclusion/ Students prepare to collect seaweed to bring back to class. Credit: NOAA Fisheries Need for land-based culture Ḵ’aach’ or dulse is a traditionally important species of seaweed that has been harvested in Southeast Alaska for millennia by the Tlingit and Haida peoples. Tribal members have expressed concern that this vibrant red seaweed could be threatened […]]]>
    Students prepare to collect seaweed to bring back to class. Credit: NOAA Fisheries

    Need for land-based culture

    Ḵ’aach’ or dulse is a traditionally important species of seaweed that has been harvested in Southeast Alaska for millennia by the Tlingit and Haida peoples. Tribal members have expressed concern that this vibrant red seaweed could be threatened by climate change, coastal contamination and harvesting pressures. At the request of Justina Hotch, an educator from the Klukwan Native Community in Alaska, NOAA’s Alaska Regional Aquaculture Program developed a culture and small-scale curriculum for cultivating Ḵ’aach ‘ in a K-12 classroom in Klukwan. The curriculum and materials were also shared with 3rd and 4th graders in Juneau.

    Grant to prioritize aquaculture inclusiveness

    The project received a Diversity and Inclusion grant from the International Call for Aquaculture Funds and is one of the first projects to be funded under this mechanism. NOAA provides many federal grants and assistance programs to promote sustainable aquaculture Across the country. Aquaculture is one of the most efficient ways to produce protein (like those found in dulse). It currently provides over 50% of all seafood consumed by humans.

    Increasing diversity and inclusion in aquaculture reinforces traditional ways of cultivating sea life for food, while teaching the care and handling of algae. The inclusion of traditional ecological knowledge and practices enhances the success of these projects while providing leadership within the community.

    “A number of algae traditionally important to Southeast Alaska have become harder to find, whether due to changes in ocean conditions or other factors. Land-based cultivation methods offer an alternative, and bringing these methods into the classroom helps excite children about the possibilities of seaweed aquaculture in our state,” said Alicia BishopNOAA Alaska Regional Aquaculture Coordinator.

    Practical education

    The tumbling culture was created using basic parts from a hardware store:

    • Action Packers
    • Five gallon buckets
    • Smaller perforated tube for bubbles
    • A chiller
    • PVC pipes
    • Lights
    • An air pump

    With the addition of artificial seawater and nutrients, tumbling culture can mimic the marine environment. This makes it possible to grow dulse in the classroom, even far from the ocean. Drum cultures were built in Alaska Fisheries Science Center Ted Stevens Marine Research Institute then transported to Klukwan for classroom use. Students are responsible for near-daily upkeep and upkeep of the tanks, which includes adding nutrients, changing water, cleaning the tanks, and charting growth.

    The students work with Ms. Hotch to collect seaweed, clean it in fresh water, and break it up for growth. Using artificial grow lights on a timer and keeping the water at 10 degrees Celsius mimics the ideal growth conditions for algae.

    The program covers the life cycle and structure of dulse, comparing seaweed to land plants, and an art project creating bookmarks from pressed seaweed (a class favorite).

    This program offers a hands-on approach to learning about a culturally significant species through its care and culture. It brings together community knowledge and research to educate a new generation about an important food source.

    Share the bounty

    Before going up to Klukwan, NOAA researchers shared the algae studies program with students from Juneau before their week of exploring the sea. The students enjoyed touching and smelling different types of algae and created additional seaweed bookmarks to share with their peers in Klukwan. Klukwan students collected and dried Ḵ’aach’ to share with community members. Ḵ’aach’ is a popular snack that can be dried on cookie sheets or fried with sugar for a sweet or savory treat.

    Inspired Traditions for the Classroom

    Students working with dulse in class.  Credit: NOAA Fisheries
    Students working with dulse in class. Credit: NOAA Fisheries

    Low tides in May allowed Klukwan students to pick up seaweed to bring back to class. They also observed various marine species in the field, inspected different seaweed under the microscope, and learned about traditional seaweed harvesting from the elders. This field experience is an excellent basis for introducing the cultural significance of Ḵ’aach’ as ​​well as its importance as a subsistence food for the Tlingit and Haida.

    The main objective of the project is to develop Ḵ’aach’ for students. A secondary objective is to transfer the knowledge explored in class to the Chilkat Indian Village and the Chilkoot Indian Association for the eventual development of commercial aquaculture and the sale of seaweed. Head teacher, Ms Hotch, defined the core values ​​of the program to align with the management of wild crops, community access to traditional foods for subsistence and ceremonies, income generation and education of young people .

    Dr. Jordan Hollarsmithhead of aquaculture research at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center, said, “Community collaborations ensure that our research meets the diverse needs of Alaskans, while also giving us the opportunity to learn from people who have harvested these species for generations.”

    The hope is that this aquaculture project with native and coastal Alaskan communities will be adaptable to more classrooms. The success of the project will allow students to cultivate Ḵ’aach’ with or without access to seawater. The program will reach even more diverse communities to learn about drum cultivation methods while building knowledge and traditional practices.

    Source: NOAA-Alaska Regional Office

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    Audi campaigns for more diversity and inclusion in business relationships https://elsverds.org/audi-campaigns-for-more-diversity-and-inclusion-in-business-relationships/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 08:06:15 +0000 https://elsverds.org/audi-campaigns-for-more-diversity-and-inclusion-in-business-relationships/ Everyone is talking about diversity and inclusion (D&I). But what does this mean for the business relationships Audi has, and how can we integrate D&I here? Our general understanding of diversity is that people with different skills and backgrounds come together to work. Not all people are equally represented in (economic) life and they do […]]]>

    Everyone is talking about diversity and inclusion (D&I). But what does this mean for the business relationships Audi has, and how can we integrate D&I here? Our general understanding of diversity is that people with different skills and backgrounds come together to work. Not all people are equally represented in (economic) life and they do not have the same opportunities to participate from the outset. This is why we are actively campaigning for more diversity. Our goal is to help diversify our professional environment globally.

    We have already taken a number of steps that help us operate in a more diverse and inclusive way. We have been implementing holistic diversity management since 2017, the Audi Group’s international production sites have gradually followed suit since 2019, and sales sites worldwide will follow in the future. Audi is increasingly focusing on creating a common understanding and raising awareness among employees in its own organization. This includes training courses on unconscious bias, toolkits for inclusive leadership and equal opportunity processes, as well as cooperations with external initiatives to promote diversity.

    We are now extending this commitment to our business relationships. We want to work more closely with various suppliers in our daily work, for example with social enterprises and minority-owned businesses (MOBs). Together with our suppliers, we aim to demonstrate that diversity and inclusion are important aspects that can be leveraged in our journey towards a successful and more sustainable cooperation.

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    Young people discover facets of Mhadei’s diversity | Goa News https://elsverds.org/young-people-discover-facets-of-mhadeis-diversity-goa-news/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 23:12:00 +0000 https://elsverds.org/young-people-discover-facets-of-mhadeis-diversity-goa-news/ Keri: From enjoying a nature trail to participating in a tree-planting campaign in Maloli, a group of 75 young people had a memorable experience recently, on the eve of World Health Day. environment, in the forests of the Mhadei river basin in Sattari. Organized by the Vivekanand Environment Awareness Brigade of Keri, in association with […]]]>
    Keri: From enjoying a nature trail to participating in a tree-planting campaign in Maloli, a group of 75 young people had a memorable experience recently, on the eve of World Health Day. environment, in the forests of the Mhadei river basin in Sattari.
    Organized by the Vivekanand Environment Awareness Brigade of Keri, in association with the Mhadei Wildlife Sanctuary, the group was introduced to the various facets of biodiversity in Mhadei.
    Developed by the Goa Wildlife Division in Maloli, the informative and educational nature trail has helped raise awareness of the richness of biodiversity and educated them on the little-known aspects of the forest and wildlife.
    Suryakant Gaonkar from Bhuipal spoke about the floral richness of the region. The session included a field study highlighting the medicinal and ecological importance of plants.
    Walking through the leaf litter, attendees were captivated to see a poisonous hump-nosed viper in its natural habitat while multicolored butterflies fluttered around them.
    Vitthal Shelke spoke about reptilian diversity in the region. He also explained the pugmarks, droppings and other evidence indicating the presence of wild animals. Subodh Naik presented avian diversity and explained their role in the pollination process of plants.
    Rangeland Forest Manager Deepak Tandel explained to participants how the lush forest enriches people’s lives and livelihoods while providing shelter, food and fodder for wild animals. “The activities instilled in us the need to live in harmony with nature and the importance of environmental protection,” said Dr. Krutika Gawas, who participated in the planting of some native tree species.
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    44% of Earth’s land needs conservation to protect biological diversity and environmental systems https://elsverds.org/44-of-earths-land-needs-conservation-to-protect-biological-diversity-and-environmental-systems/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 03:52:19 +0000 https://elsverds.org/44-of-earths-land-needs-conservation-to-protect-biological-diversity-and-environmental-systems/ In order to safeguard biodiversity, 44% of Earth’s geographical coverage, or 64 million square kilometers (24.7 million square miles), must be saved, according to a new study published in the journal Science on June 3. Dr. James R. Allan from the University of Amsterdam led a team that used powerful geospatial algorithms to find the […]]]>

    In order to safeguard biodiversity, 44% of Earth’s geographical coverage, or 64 million square kilometers (24.7 million square miles), must be saved, according to a new study published in the journal Science on June 3.

    Dr. James R. Allan from the University of Amsterdam led a team that used powerful geospatial algorithms to find the best places around the world to save species and terrestrial ecosystems.

    They also used spatially explicit land use scenarios to estimate how much of this area will be threatened by human activity by 2030.

    The Earth needs conservation for future generations

    (Photo: INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP via Getty Images)


    The finding has crucial policy implications as nations are currently negotiating a post-2020 global biodiversity strategy under the Convention on Biological Diversity, ideally coming into force later this year, with new biodiversity goals and targets. of biodiversity, in accordance with ScienceDaily.

    This will set the conservation agenda for at least the next decade, and countries will be required to report regularly on progress towards these goals.

    According to co-author Dr Kendall Jones, conservation planning specialist at the Wildlife Conservation Society, governments set a global target more than a decade ago to conserve at least 17% of terrestrial areas. through protected areas and other site-based approaches to enhance biodiversity. and ecosystems.

    While this is a positive start, the research suggests that more aggressive goals and strategies are needed to maintain ecological integrity beyond the 30% target.

    If countries are serious about conserving biodiversity and the ecosystem services that support life on Earth, they must rapidly increase the scope and effectiveness of their conservation activities.

    According to the authors, the study provides essential data for conservation and development planning, as well as guidance for future national and global conservation programs.

    They also stressed that all selected lands should be maintained through a variety of species and ecosystem conservation techniques, including other effective area-based conservation measures, rather than being declared protected areas.

    Read also : People’s views on environmental conservation may be linked to genes

    Environmental Protection

    Environmental conservation is the act of people saving the environment from extinction and ecosystem devastation, usually as a result of pollution and human activity.

    Because we all depend on each other for our survival, conservation is essential to conserve and help both animals and trees.

    Trees help humans breathe and breathe by converting carbon dioxide generated by industry into oxygen.

    The extinction of species would imply that they would disappear forever, unable to be seen by curious eyes or studied by learned minds.

    Moreover, such ecological loss or annihilation would disrupt the food web, causing the entire ecosystem to malfunction.

    Despite their differences, environmental conservation and preservation are sometimes used interchangeably.

    Conservation refers to the current and future wise use of the environment and its resources.

    Preservation, at either end, is a more rigorous method in which the ecosystem, land, and environmental assets are left in their natural state rather than being consumed by humans.

    Related article: The role of business in environmental sustainability

    © 2022 NatureWorldNews.com All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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    Three honored for their commitment to diversity at the College of Ag Sciences https://elsverds.org/three-honored-for-their-commitment-to-diversity-at-the-college-of-ag-sciences/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://elsverds.org/three-honored-for-their-commitment-to-diversity-at-the-college-of-ag-sciences/ UNIVERSITY PARK, Pennsylvania – Three people are the 2022 recipients Dr. William Henson Excellence Award for Diversity from Penn State College of Agricultural Scienceswhich recognizes distinctive and outstanding teaching, research, outreach or creative work that advances diversity within the college. This year’s recipients are Marjorie “Maisie” Macknight, doctoral candidate in the Department of Ecosystem Science […]]]>

    UNIVERSITY PARK, Pennsylvania – Three people are the 2022 recipients Dr. William Henson Excellence Award for Diversity from Penn State College of Agricultural Scienceswhich recognizes distinctive and outstanding teaching, research, outreach or creative work that advances diversity within the college.

    This year’s recipients are Marjorie “Maisie” Macknight, doctoral candidate in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management; Allyson Muth, Assistant Research Professor of Private Forest Management and Director of the James C. Finley Center for Private Forests; and Justine Lindemann, Assistant Professor of Community Development and Resilience.

    “I am delighted to congratulate such deserving recipients,” said Patreese Ingram, associate dean for multicultural affairs and chair of the college’s Diversity Coordinating Council, which sponsors the award. “Their efforts are impacting our college and beyond, and we commend them for their commitment to fostering diversity.”

    Marjorie “Maisie” Macknight

    Macknight is a leading advocate for improving diversity within the college. She has served on diversity, equity and inclusion committees for the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management and for the Interuniversity Graduate Diploma in Ecology program since 2020.

    She is currently a graduate assistant on the department’s graduate diversity, equity and inclusion committee and served as its chair.

    Macknight was also a recipient of the Harrar Fellowship, which offers advanced doctoral students the opportunity to gain teaching experience under the guidance of a professor mentor. She chose to develop a new course on diversity, equality and inclusion for undergraduate students that focuses on the need for social justice to ensure the success of conservation efforts.

    As an undergraduate student at the University of Georgia, Macknight championed efforts to write an open letter to faculty at the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, calling for greater consideration of diversity, equity and inclusion in its program.

    Allyson Muth

    Muth serves as chair of the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee and has led its initial efforts to address diversity issues since its inception in 2017.

    Through his efforts, college faculty voted to form the Diversity Committee that same year to address and strive to implement diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts in the classroom. From that point on, Muth worked to advance the department’s curriculum and create awareness through training and mentorship opportunities.

    Her efforts to promote inclusion led to the launch of the Women and their Woods program, in cooperation with the Delaware Highlands Conservancy. The program is one of the first of its kind in the country.

    Additionally, Muth is active in the Women’s Forest Congress, a forum to develop strategies and solutions for forests that look through a female lens. She also co-developed and taught a course on Equity and Inclusion in the Green Profession during the Spring 2020 semester.

    Justine Lindeman

    Lindemann has worked tirelessly to advance the conversation about diversity, equity, and inclusion through her intellectual and educational leadership at Penn State.

    She is co-developer and co-lead of the Racial Action: Conversations in Extension initiative, a dialogue-based extension program and professional development opportunity for extension educators, affiliate faculty, and administrators. The initiative is centered on the persistence of racism and designed to prepare participants to work in an increasingly diverse and multicultural society in urban and rural spaces.

    Additionally, Lindemann has been instrumental in developing the Anti-Racism Faculty Teaching Community, an initiative in which instructors discuss approaches and methods to effectively address diversity and multiculturalism in their teaching.

    Lindemann created and leads within Penn State Extension and the college the Urban Resilience Task Force and the Urban Resilience Quarterly Report, aimed at highlighting and advancing outreach work that reflects diversity values , equity, inclusion and democracy, with a particular focus on urban food systems.

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